Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Catalina Island Somewhat Deep Week

Friday Sept 27 9am – Sun Oct 6 7pm

Please join me and a bunch of other freedivers for this unique event!

If you don’t know California diving, there is abundant marine life, but it can be very cold – typically 10C/50F in Monterey.

Catalina Island offers similar scenery, but in late Sept it is about 24C/75F, with viz 10-15m. It will look much like this, but almost tropical – https://vimeo.com/tufftravels – first three videos.

The marine park, Casino Point, is incredibly convenient. Just a few hundred meters from town, with rental shop on site. Just walk down the steps, swim a few hundred meters, and you have 30m of depth. The perfect place to do your first 100ft dive!

This is an informal camp, not sanctioned by any shop or organization. There will be experienced divers and instructors like myself from different organizations to give out tips in a non-certification setting. DAN insurance is recommended. Any outdoor activity has inherent risks, especially freediving, so you assume all risks and release all other parties against any claim by participating in this event.

The plan is to dive every day in the park until Sunday or Monday. Because it is so warm and convenient, you probably will be able to do 3 or even 4 2 hour training sessions, though 2 x 3hr will be more typical. If you can extend your stay during the week, we also will rent a skiff to go to other parts of the island for fun diving, put out a counter-balance so you can dive deeper – max 60m – depending on consensus, etc. Lobster season opens on Saturday.

There will be modest logistics fees for this event. It depends on how many days and what you want to do. e.g., just using a line and diving with friends vs. needing counter-balance/safety/coaching for a 60m dive. The counter-balance is an efficient carbon-fiber rig of the type used for depth competitions. Just DM me to discuss or email robert.lee at berkeley.edu.

Non-certified divers are welcome, but you are limited to snorkeling and fun diving on your own – no training.

Additional notes:

Fly into LAX or LGB (closer). For those who drive, Long Beach ferry parking is about $20/day: https://www.catalinaexpress.com/schedule-fares.html
You can fly direct to the small airport. Prop charters from SF area are about $10K round trip for 5.

I have reserved some rooms because I got a fantastic deal for the weekend. Hotels are scarce in Avalon, and price variance is high. The small room is about $150 with tax per night, the big room is about $250 with tax per night. I have reserved the below Sept 26-30 will hold them till Sept 15.

https://www.catalinaislandinn.com/rooms/queen-bay-window/#top – no AC, shouldn’t be needed – $400 total
https://www.catalinaislandinn.com/rooms/family/#top – $800 total, 3 beds

You can also camp or find another hotel. Hermit Gulch camp ground is easy, 2km/1mi walk, and has tent cabins for 6. https://catalinachamber.bookdirect.net/

Please RSVP on the FB event if you have FB.

Feel free to discuss, look for rides, etc., in the FB comments.

Learn to Wim Hof Magnified

Learn to hold your breath for 2-3 times longer than with the Wim Hof method, with similar stress reduction and wellness benefits. Workshops in Kona, Bali, and other tropical locales. Yoga, great local food, yoga sessions, and more.

Optional: apply these learnings to underwater meditation like this:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

rlee at codex dot stanford dot edu

fl0wstate.com/robert

Aug 10: Breath Control & Intro to Freediving: Seminar at UCSF

Join me and Professor Kevin Yackle at UCSF Mission Bay for a seminar on breath work and intro to freediving, 4:30-6:30 on Th Aug 10, 2017. Limited spots available (including by video). Please RSVP to me, rlee at codex.stanford.edu

http://yacklelab.ucsf.edu/

4:30-5:15 Breath Work

5:15-6:30 Apnea (up to 3 minutes)

Conference Room: Genentech Hall S261.

Google Hangout: meet.google.com/ogq-ajhc-mbu

If you are not familiar with UCSF campus, I suggest you meet me at The Pub at 4PM so I can take you to the conference room. There is free parking several blocks away at/near 16th Street. Otherwise use the meters or parking garage. Some of us may get dinner after.

The Pub, 1675 Owens St, San Francisco, CA 94158

More info here: https://fl0wstate.com/robert

And here: https://blog.bulletproof.com/robert-lee-breathing-for-performance-focus-freediving-185/

Here is a prologue to the seminar:

ZERO What Scared the Fearless Woman?

“What Scared the Fearless Woman?” was a 2013 story on NPR’s Science Friday. The story described a paper in Nature Neuoroscience that studied patients with a condition that causes atrophy of the brain’s amygdala center. The amygdala is a corpus that mediates fear and other emotions in humans. Thus it was believed that these patients had lost the ability to feel fear. An article in The Guardian describes the same study:

The patient known as S.M. has not experienced fear since she was a child, and has fascinated brain researchers for many years. In 2010, one team noted that she makes risky financial decisions in experimental economics games, because she isn’t afraid of losing money. Another tried everything they could to frighten the life out of her – but failed. They showed her clips from some of the scariest horror films ever made, asked her to handle large spiders and snakes, and took her to a haunted house. On no occasion did she show the smallest sign of fear, even when faced with traumatic events and potentially life-threatening threats.

The experimenters placed the patient on a breathing mask that simulated suffocation. Within seconds, S.M. started to waive and scream. To the surprise of the experimenters, and S.M. herself, it turns out that she was capable of experiencing fear, even outright panic, but only with respect to this one stimulus.

Upshot— the drive to breathe in humans is so fundamental and atavistic that it invokes an entirely different, and more basic pathway of fear than other stimuli associated with danger. And this is why exploring the nature of breathing and learning to “breathe better”, as we will do in this document, can be a unique and profoundly powerful way of managing fear and anxiety. At the end, we will also explore the challenge of learning to arrest that breathing— that is, holding our breath. Should you choose to try this extended breath holding (called voluntary apnea), you will experience a unique challenge that can result in powerful benefits for your confidence, literally on an existential level, and your peace of mind.

Hacker Hostel San Jose Area: $250/week in a new house

room_cropI have rooms for rent in my brand new house 22 miles S of San Jose airport, right off the 101. It is also close to the Morgan Hill Caltrain station, where the Google and Apple buses pick up.

Why you would want to live here:

Pristine, new house in a beautiful neighborhood near the necessities – Trader Joe’s, Target …

No lease commitment, but cheap, $250/week. Perfect if you are new to town for school, and want a place to crash while looking for a permanent place (though you are welcome to stay long term). $25 extra for private bathroom.

Easy parking.

There is also a converted library (big and cozy, but near the kitchen) available for $200/week.

Why you would NOT want to live here:

A bit of a drive to San Jose (you will want to have a car unless you are prepared for a long bike / bus ride).

The house is in a town (Morgan Hill), not a city.

The house has only the basics. It is a new and clean, but I don’t have a couch, TV, living room. This is a place to sleep, study, and is best suited for those who work long hours and/or spend their leisure time out of the house.

The housing complex does have a pool, hot tub, basketball court, outdoor grill, tables with a view for eating outside when the weather is good. I often cook and eat outside.

Additional:

My house is directly across the street from this Starbucks, open from 5:30am to 9pm. It is right next to an open field, not a concrete jungle. I work from there a lot.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Starbucks/@37.1440569,-121.6643677,15z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x8c45f19d33c3d67c!8m2!3d37.1440569!4d-121.6643677

I am pretty well connected in the Silicon Valley ecosystem: Google, VC firms, Stanford.

Please email me at rlee at codex dot stanford dot edu. I don’t check the comments below.

Your room looks like the above picture. Here is a virtual tour of a model of the home (mine is not furnished like this).

http://www.modelhomephotos.com/tours/taylormorrison/madrone_plaza/unit_A/flash/index.html

A little info about me:

fl0wstate.com/robert

Thanks!

Robert

Hacker Hostel San Jose Area: $200/week in a new house

room_cropI have rooms for rent in my brand new house 22 miles S of San Jose airport, right off the 101. It is also close to the Morgan Hill Caltrain station, where the Google and Apple buses pick up.

Why you would want to live here:

Pristine, new house in a beautiful neighborhood near the necessities – Trader Joe’s, Target …

No lease commitment, but cheap, $200/week. Perfect if you are new to town for school, and want a place to crash while looking for a permanent place (though you are welcome to stay long term).

Why you would NOT want to live here:

A bit of a drive to San Jose (you will want to have a car unless you are prepared for a long bike / bus ride).

The house is in a town (Morgan Hill), not a city.

The house has only the basics. It is a new and clean, but I don’t have a couch, TV, living room. This is a place to sleep, study, and is best suited for those who work long hours and/or spend their leisure time out of the house.

Additional:

My house is directly across the street from this Starbucks, open from 5:30am to 9pm. It is right next to an open field, not a concrete jungle. I work from there a lot.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Starbucks/@37.1440569,-121.6643677,15z/data=!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x8c45f19d33c3d67c!8m2!3d37.1440569!4d-121.6643677

I am pretty well connected in the Silicon Valley ecosystem: Google, VC firms, Stanford.

Please email me at rlee at codex dot stanford dot edu. I don’t check the comments below.

Your room looks like the above picture. Here is a virtual tour of a model of the home (mine is not furnished like this).

http://www.modelhomephotos.com/tours/taylormorrison/madrone_plaza/unit_A/flash/index.html

A little info about me:

fl0wstate.com/robert

Thanks!

Robert

Breathhold for Surfing & Freediving: Wed May 11 6-9:30 PM SF

Introduction to Breathing Skills for Surf Survival and Freediving

On May 11, I will be doing a lecture introduction to breathing skills and freediving. We will build up to a three-minute breath hold.

The curriculum will follow these materials

For those of you who don’t know me, here is my bio and podcast

Three-Part Seminar
1: Breathing Skills for Stress Management & Performance
2: Introduction to Breathhold
3: Introduction to Bay Area Diving (equipment, classes available, abalone diving)

You are welcome to bring drink and snacks, but don’t eat a large meal beforehand, because breath holds are difficult on a full stomach.

Price: $120 ($100 after $20 deposit)
Group of two : $110 each ($200 after $20 deposit)

$20 deposit payable here, which gives you an easy-to-read pdf version of the above document to review before class (optional)

Pay the balance in cash on site. Add $20 to each spot if paying the by Venmo, Check, or Credit Card

One Embarcadero Center, 4th Floor
SF 94111, Clay & Battery, 94111

Take escalator to the business lobby. Turn left at the guard desk, go to the fourth floor, text me at (510) 427-2049 and I will let you in. Class starts at 6:15, but you should aim to arrive before 6 so you don’t have to check in with the guard. You will save significant time an hassle by arriving before 6.

You can also attend by Google hangout!

Join video call

My SkypeID is buriedmirror

My # is five one oh 427 2049
Email is rlee at codex dot stanford dot edu

And finally, follow my Facebook Page for trips and adventures